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A Challenge: WebRTC Screen Sharing v2

screenshare-composite-example2-300pxIt’s been a year or more that tools like Google’s Hangouts have supported the ability to share a host computer screen with the viewing audience. This was rightfully heralded as “a very good thing indeed.” However, it’s current incarnation is considerably less than ideal and seems to be stalled. I’d like to lay out a challenge to see if anyone is interested into taking this to the next level, which is something that we’ve tried to do with a few VUC calls earlier this year.

Here’s the fundamental problem; people use screen sharing to give demos of software and share documents, which includes giving presentations a la PowerPoint, Keynote, etc. Currently, Hangouts, Jitsi Video Bridge and the like show either the screen share or the camera. In the case of slide presentations there can be very little activity in view as the presenter speaks to the points shown on the current slide. This creates less than compelling visuals.

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No Jitter: No HDVoice Either!

While I recently lamented the last UC Strategies podcast woefully narrowband presentation, in the interest of fairness I must today point out that they are not alone in this. Today the latest No Jitter Podcast, hosted by Guy Clinch, published an interview with Andrew Prokop of Arrow S3. It suffers a similar lack of lack of regard for HDVoice.

Mr Prokop’s SIP Adventures blog has proven interesting, so I thought the podcast worth a listen. Sadly, while the host is presented full bandwidth, as might be expected from a local recording, the guest is presented in narrowband. Given that the subject matter is WebRTC I think that this is more than a little anachronistic. WebRTC-based services are in fact a very easy way to enjoy wideband audio for the purposes of producing a podcast.

Dragging the podcast in my trusty editor I find it to the a definitive example of full-band audio vs narrowband. The file is sampled at 44.1 kHz, so the top of the vertical axis is 22 kHz. The guests audio is a good quality PSTN call, but even that is quite a contrast from the host. This contrast is very jarring to the listener.

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Voxbone Enters The WebRTC Game

This morning’s inbox included an announcement from Voxbone about their own WebRTC service. Based in Belgium Voxbone are a provider of various services to telecom companies. They are most commonly known for providing DIDs in 50+ countries around the world.…

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OnSIP Launches Into WebRTC Platform-as-a-Service Offering

onsip-logo_300pxThis week OnSIP, long known for its popular SMB hosted PBX service, launched a new initiative offering WebRTC– based platform-as-a-service. Their core business has been the hosted PBX service, which is built upon SIP standards. This new service targets web developers who want to easily incorporate WebRTC into their applications.

The companies web site has been extended to include an area described as OnSIP For Developers which details the service offering. The principle behind the service is to leverage their core SIP infrastructure to deliver the signaling solution that WebRTC alone does not provide. Thus a web developer can easily create a WebRTC based front-end that’s backed by the scalable, geographically distributed infrastructure of the OnSIP hosted PBX platform.

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