• John Walshaw

    Hey, really glad to see this post. I’d heard about this, but this is the first objective demonstration I’ve seen… and a very good one at that. Do you know if this is a cellular specific technology or is it G.722.1C (Siren 14) implemented over cellular? The “kid” in the video did a sales pitch, and I wish he’s given a technical explanation. I don’t think we’ll see this here in the US for a while though. Everyone here is too busy talking about iPhones, 3G coverage maps, and LTE. There isn’t space for anything else, even if it’s the one thing that would revolutionize calling.

    • AFAIK the entire mobile industry has lined up in support of AMR-WB, aka G.722.2. Of course, just to be different Qualcomm and the CDMA realm have their own codec called EVRC-WB.

      In truth, G.722.1C is not very widespread in its application. It’s implemented in Polycom conference phones and telepresence suites. I believe that recent releases of Asterisk and Freeswitch can handle it. I think that Vivox might use it in some online gaming. It seems to be solely applied in the wired realm.

      • John Walshaw

        Thanks for the feedback. I’m always keeping my eye on support for wideband codecs, especially those that are low bandwidth, like Siren 14. G.722 isn’t small enough to use in a large private WAN environment. I was hoping that the Avaya 1692 branded Polycom would support Siren 14 in practice, but it seems that Avaya dev did not finish figuring it out yet. It’s a real shame seeing that the SIP equivalents from Polycom do.

        • In the case of Siren14 I suspect it’s not so much a case of them “figuring it out.” But rather they don’t support that codec at the switch, so it’s better left off the handsets. Or possibly they can’t support it across the range of devices they offer, so they don’t want it anywhere.