Unexpected: OSX on a Polycom VVX-600

vvx-600-with-OSX-320pxA Polycom VVX-600 is my primary desk phone. It has been since its launch demoted the VVX-500 to a lesser role. Both are great phones, but I find the larger touch screen of the 600 model better for both my eyes and fingers. One of the things that keeps the Polycom phone on my desk is its ability to conveniently record calls to a USB memory stick. It’s a capability that I’d find difficult to give up.

On the other hand, in my daily routine I find that I don’t use USB memory stick very often anymore. I have a couple hanging around, but not the little stash that once graced my computer bag. So, occasionally, when I’m in a hurry, I pull the SanDisk Cruzer that lives plugged into the back of the VVX and use it to sneakernet a few files from here to there.

Continue reading “Unexpected: OSX on a Polycom VVX-600”

Meta: WordPress Apps For OSX & Windows

WordPress App on MacBookToday saw the launch of WordPress 4.4. For me this is significant as most of my writing for publication online ends up in WordPress.

Some time ago I documented my initial experience with the platform and hosting services. Since then I’ve grown to admire the WordPress team for delivering utterly seamless upgrades, and Lightningbase as a wonderful hosting company. This site is just passing three years live at Lightningbase.

While I spend a lot of time in WordPress, the actual writing most typically happens in Windows Live Writer.  I like the program for it’s simple functionality. I’ll have more on that in a post to follow tomorrow.

Recent changes in WordPress have included new back-end functionality that’s designed to facilitate more evolved front-end applications. The WordPress mobile apps (Android, iOS) have been around for a while. I’ve had one loaded to my Nexus 7 tablet for a long while, but never actually written anything substantial that way. I’ve tried a few times, but ultimately found the experience lackluster.  Continue reading “Meta: WordPress Apps For OSX & Windows”

Counterpath Soft Phones on OSX

macbook1white20050516A viable G.722 capable soft phone for the Mac is one of the key pieces missing in driving further adoption of wideband telephony. I single out the G.722 codec specifically as that is key to integration with existing hard phones and conference systems or services.

Earlier today Randulo did a little experiment and discovered that two of the Counterpath soft phone clients, Eyebeam & X-Lite, work on Apple systems. He ran them using Parallels & Windows XP on OSX.

This may not seem like big news, but it does help further wideband cause considerably. Sources close to Counterpath report that they remain very interested in an updated native Mac soft phone client, but it’s not currently one of their top priorities.